Numbers: Christopher Jones at Cre8ery Gallery| Exhibition Evaluation| Creative Boundless

I had a mini assignment in school to evaluate a particular exhibition in my city. I thought this was actually a fun article to write, so I decided to share it. 

Christopher Jones I feel is one of Winnipeg’s newest emerging artist who is opening a past of hurtful events in his history’s hometown, “Newfoundland”. By presenting ideas of perception, new mixed media art and history; I anticipate Jones emotionally connection in this accommodation that truly expose the story of 800 men who died in Newfoundland through his, “Numbers” exhibition. With the unpredictable deaths, I’m merely attached to Jones abstract artwork that remember’s the solider’s who died in this tragedy.

 

The encounter of the past begins when I see the light enhancing the dark blue, yellow and red fall colours that also seemed to be well elevated on the right side of the gallery. I know this is a time of remembrance and sorrow. Unknowing where to truly start, the light is aimlessly directing my fullest attention to the left. Where the biggest sculpture and abstract looking ocean, I feel this story already starts off in the shadows.  The uncertainty of two large poles that may resemble a boat or a solider’s legs signify the start of an army beginning war. I think that if these two poles resembled more of a full set of human legs, it would clearly portray Jones message that the soldiers signified bravery and strength. The uneven class pieces imitate recognizable waves of the ocean that are evidently protecting bronze circular medals that represent our hero’s that have washed away. My judgment indicates the uneven class pieces conclude the life of the Newfoundland soldiers. 

 

Simultaneously, the exhibition continues in a small room filled of a row of mirror’s, placed horizontally with a necklace of green dark tags, hanging with the bronze circular medals. In war, having only one of two green tags indicates a troop member has died. Knowing that, I know by looking at my own reflection is opening up the lives of the soldiers who cluelessly died. The consistency of mirrors and the necklaces uniquely bodies the soldiers who combined together in after life, reminding us they are watching over us. 

 

Afterward, I am directed in the main room where the consistency of the horizontal representation style is continued into stoneware that resembles the ships. The medals are placed on top of the stoneware where we see abstract lines and blotchy designs underneath, returning to my first glance of those those dark blue, yellow and red fall colours. The bareness may display the stories of the soldiers or the territories that may have been left from the soldiers. Having a few stonewares at the beginning would strongly show if we were leaving behind territories or the soldiers. 

 

Furthermore, displaying the stoneware in a display that is a circular with just one medal would be enough to clearly connect the story of the two statue legs and the mirrors where the soldiers were going to fight and passed to remember their sorrows. 

 

The exhibition finishes of a simple painting of the continuous dark blue, yellow and red fall colours of an ocean with a white boat floating away. 

 

Though, the brilliance of this exhibition may illustrate the repetitiveness of the bronze circular medals were the true cause of the indescribable death by portraying the broken glass as the trap where the soldiers may have sunken or caught their necks; mistakenly trying to simply show heroism and strength. 

 

To summarize, the gallery speaks on the journey of the men who died not because of the possible start of the war; but because of the unknowing fact of these circular bronze medals that we’re actually anonymously poisonous. Communicating with a harsh reality, I feel the confusion and lost soldiers were falsely directed to the beds of their death. I will advocate that Jones exhibition focus’s on abstract and representational components where you have the ability to decide the beginning and end to the war.


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HELLO MY NAME IS JENN! THE FOUNDER OF WWW.CREATIVEBOUNDLESS.COM. I OFFER CREATIVE ARTISTIC (FACEPAINT & PORTRAITS) SERVICES TO ALLOW CLIENTS VALUE SPECIAL OCCASIONS AND MEMORIES.  I ALSO TEACH FUN, BUBBLY AND CREATIVE BIZ OWNERS HOW TO CREATE A MEMORABLE AND CHILD LIKE BUSINESS THROUGH FACE PAINTING AND OTHER ARTISTIC SERVICES (ONLINE & OFFLINE).



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